Black History Month

Black History Month

Carter G. Woodson and his organization, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), recognized Negro History Week. It was first celebrated during the 2nd week in February 1926. This week was chosen because of the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass who were symbols of freedom for Dr. Woodson. National Negro History Week became a celebrated time in African American life bringing awareness and education in schools about the importance and contributions of African Americans and Blacks in American History.

In 1976 President Gerald R. Ford expanded Black History Week to a month-long celebration. Since then, each president has signed an African American History Month proclamation. ASNLH is now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) and it continues to promote the study of Black history.

Black History Month Graphic
Hand graphic

Celebrate

We celebrate African American and Black History Month in February of each year. During this month African Americans and people of African descent look no further than their race for a reason to feel proud of the many positive contributions they have made in the world.

African Americans have helped to shape the world and have brought respect, value, culture, knowledge, and more to the human race. These brave souls are honored for their bravery, tenacity, spiritual heart, and persistence. Every day, we should celebrate African Americans and those of African descent and every February we should bring extra attention to a job well done!


Copyright. © 2022, African American Museum of Southern Arizona. All Rights Reserved. No image, sound or text from this site can be used without the expressed written permission of the museum’s Board of Directors.